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▪ Deep Groove Ball Bearing
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▪ Angular Contact Ball Bearing
▪ Ceramic Ball Bearing
▪ KP-A Series Control Ball Bearing
▪ DW Series Bearing
▪ Non-Standard Bearing
►  Bearing Parts
▪ Bearing Outer Ring
▪ Bearing Inner Ring
▪ Balls
▪ Bearing Cage or Retainer
▪ Shields or Seal
▪ Lubrication
 

  1. Does a higher ABEC mean a quieter bearing?
  2. Does internal clearance effect the bearing precision (MC3 vs P3)?
  3. How can I make sure I select the right bearing for my application?
  4. How do I hold the bearing in place in my application?
  5. How fast can a bearing rotate?
  6. How much grease is too much?
  7. I have been quoted a very low price for what looks to be a very good bearing by someone representing a Chinese factory. How is XW different?
  8. I have seen Chinese bearings with no brand names or names I have never heard of. How will I know what brand I am buying?
  9. Is your bearing from China?
  10. We have had a bad experience with Chinese bearings. How would working with XW be any different?
  11. What are shields and seals, and which one is better?
  12. What does the term "electric motor quality" mean?
  13. What factors should be considered when choosing a bearing?
  14. What grease is best?
  15. What is the difference between angular contact bearings and deep groove ball bearings?
  16. What materials are XW bearings manufactured from?
  17. Why are XW's bearings separated in metric and inch series?
  18. Will stainless steel protect against rust?

  1. Does a higher ABEC mean a quieter bearing?
    For XW bearings, a separate noise rating controls noise performance. This rating and its meaning can be found in the Part Numbering Section. Another major factor affecting noise performance is the grease type. For very quiet running, the selection of a quiet grease is very important. Handling, installation and use of preload will also ensure the quietest possible operation.

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  2. Does internal clearance effect the bearing precision (MC3 vs P3)?
    MC3 is an internal clearance, or the amount of internal free space between the rolling elements and the raceways of a bearing. P3 does not exist. P6 is an ISO tolerance class equivalent to ABEC 3, or the accuracy the bearing is manufactured to. Clearance does not affect tolerance and tolerance does not affect clearance.

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  3. How can I make sure I select the right bearing for my application?
    We strongly suggest you contact our bearing application engineers at the time of your design specifications. XW offers an experienced sales and engineering staff to help in the design and selection process, insuring your success.

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  4. How do I hold the bearing in place in my application?
    Holding the bearing in place can be done by using adhesive, pressing the inner and/or outer ring in place, or by designing a bearing pocket that will enclose the bearing. Each of these methods has its advantages, A few rules of thumb apply: For adhesive, care must be taken to keep the adhesive from getting inside the bearing. Adhesive in the bearing will cause the grease to breakdown, and the bearing will fail early. For press fitting the bearing, the shaft and housing tolerances should be kept so that the interference fit does not cause the bearing to bind. There should be some radial play remaining in the bearing after press fit. Also, during the press fit installation process, care must be taken not to damage the raceways and balls by not supporting the rings that are being pressed. For the bearing pocket, care must be taken to keep the inner and outer rings from moving freely in the bearing pocket or on the shaft. Movement can cause heat build-up and premature failure.

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  5. How fast can a bearing rotate?
    The speed of a bearing will depend on the bearing size, the lubrication used, the bearing material, the cage material and how long the life requirement is. Bearings can typically rotate at high speeds with good life performance.

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  6. How much grease is too much?
    For general applications a grease fill of 30% of the free space in the bearing seems to be accepted as standard by most manufacturers. Slow speed applications in harsh environments (such as agricultural machinery) can sometimes require a larger fill. High speed applications (ie. hand tools) can require a lesser fill. Check with XW engineering for any special requirements.

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  7. I have been quoted a very low price for what looks to be a very good bearing by someone representing a Chinese factory. How is XW different?
    It is easy to quote a low price if you do not have the product. That's why XW Bearing has warehouse and office in USA. Our prices are extremely competitive and better yet, we can ship bearings to you from our CA area warehouse at that price.

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  8. I have seen Chinese bearings with no brand names or names I have never heard of. How will I know what brand I am buying?
    When you buy from XW, the only brand you get is ours. The XW name is imprinted on all bearings as well as on the boxes they come packed in.

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  9. Is your bearing from China?
    Our plants in China (all ISO 9000 certified) supply most of our products. We also have long-standing relationships with other high quality manufacturers around the world who supply certain sizes and configurations.

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  10. We have had a bad experience with Chinese bearings. How would working with XW be any different?
    When you work with XW, you can be sure that the products you receive have the quality you expect. This is not true with bearings supplied by brokers. XW's plants are ISO 9001 certified, feature modern manufacturing equipment and employ operators and inspectors who understand and are specially trained in US quality standards. They know that the only products we accept must first meet our rigorous quality standards.

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  11. What are shields and seals, and which one is better?
    Shields and seals are in place to keep contamination out of the bearing. In order of effectiveness, the enclosures that are offered are as follows: metal shields, rubber non-contact seals, teflon non-contact seals, and rubber contact seals. As the sealing performance is increased, the torque to turn the bearing will also increase. It is important to know the application's condition and life requirements so the best seal choice can be made. Specific information about the description of each seal and the pros and cons can be found in the Shields and Seals section.

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  12. What does the term "electric motor quality" mean?
    The term "electric motor quality" is freely used in describing bearings that meet a perceived "higher" level of quality than the standard ABEC1 bearing.

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  13. What factors should be considered when choosing a bearing?
    All application data (loads, speeds, orientation, etc.), intended use, and environment.

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  14. What grease is best?
    Grease selection will depend on the application conditions. With a wide variety of greases available, solutions are available for most requirements. There is, however, no perfect grease. Each grease has good points, but will fall short in other areas. High temperature greases will not be able to handle very high loads. Quiet greases will break down at high temperature, etc. It is important to know what the application requirements will be so that the best grease can be recommended. Lubrication information and a Table of Commonly Used Lubricants are available for your review.

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  15. What is the difference between angular contact bearings and deep groove ball bearings?
    Deep groove ball bearings are a non-separable type bearing with the line connecting contact points of the steel ball and inner ring and the steel ball and outer ring of 0? in the radial direction. They are designed to take mainly radial loads but can handle some axial load in either direction. Angular contact bearings are a non-separable type. The line connecting contact points of the steel ball and inner ring and the steel ball and outer ring create an angle with the line drawn in the radial direction called the contact angle. In addition to radial loads, relatively heavy axial loads in one direction can be accommodated by an angular contact bearing. The larger the contact angle, the larger the axial loading capacity becomes.

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  16. What materials are XW bearings manufactured from?
    XW Bearing produces with three types of material. Chrome alloy steel, stainless steel and Ceramic. Stainless steel is recommended for applications where corrosion is a possibility, and is also mainly for miniature bearings in which slight contamination can cause disturbance of operation. Chrome alloy steel is harder, and will provide a quieter run in applications where noise is a major concern. Chrome alloy steel, however, will corrode at a faster rate than stainless steel.
    Ceramic is lighter, smoother, stiffer, harder, corrosion resistant, and electrically resistant. These fundamental characteristics allow for a wide range of performance enhancements in bearings. Ceramic Balls are particularly well suited for use in extremely harsh environments where high temperatures or corrosive and erosive substances are present.

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  17. Why are XW's bearings separated in metric and inch series?
    XW bearings follow the worldwide bearing sizing standards. These standards have resulted in two types of bearings, the metric and the inch. A standard bearing refers to a bearing that is in such worldwide demand that large volumes are produced. This virtually guarantees continuity of supply while assuring pricing benefits for your OEM requirements.

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  18. Will stainless steel protect against rust?
    Stainless steel is corrosion resistant, but will rust in corrosive environments. Stainless steel will corrode at a much slower rate than chrome alloy steel. If you don?t want it to be completely rust, you need to have nickel stainless steel.

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